• Omnitrition Investigation

    Omnitrition International Inc. is a US supplements company that specialises in weight loss supplements. The flagship product is Omni Drops – a homeopathic liquid diet drop that you take in combination with a very low calorie diet and some people claim to have lost vast amounts of weight in using this program.

    Omnitrition is an MLM company meaning that if you like the supplements you can sign up and sell it yourself as a distributor. Homeopathic diet drops? Multi level Marketing? These two facts alone have got our sensors flashing on red alert so we take an in depth look at Omnitrition to find out more.

    Omnitrition

    Omnitrition International Inc is an American company based in Reno, Nevada, which has been in operation for the last 27 years so is very well established. It is a multi level marketing company and was founded by Roger Daley and his wife Barbara, still the public faces of the company.

    omnitrition

    Omnitrition sells supplements relating to general health, vitality and weight loss. These include Omni4, a general purpose health supplement, and Omnitrim Nitelite, a supplement that helps you lose weight while you sleep. Away from weight loss, Omnitrition market products aimed at increasing vitality, such as grape powder and potions devised as speciality products, such as Hair and Nails – a supplement to improve the condition of your hair and nails.

    However, the flagship product is Omni Drops – a homeopathic diet drop that you take to support a weight loss program, which is essentially a very low calorie diet of around 500 calories a day.

    Strangely, for a company that have been in operation for such a long time, there is very little information about any of the supplements. It is also impossible to see a complete product range or price list unless you join the company yourself as a distributor or go through a distributor to buy.

    Background to Omnitrition

    The founder, Roger Daley, used to be involved with Herbalife in the 1980s before quitting to start this company, and Omnitrition is run along much the same lines. There is a network of distributors and it is easy to join. To do this, you just pay a $49.95 joining fee then you can receive Omnitrition training and marketing tools to help get you started. Every year you also have to pay an annual fee of $60, and failure to do this will see you kicked out of the company.

    As with all MLM businesses, you are encouraged to establish your own downline of sellers in order to progress to the next level of the company.

    Omnitrition were taken to court back in 1996 when they were accused of running an illegal pyramid scheme (Webster v Omnitrition International Inc). However, the court ruled in Omnitrition’s favour. The Omnitrition defence hinged upon the fact that that Omnitrition distributors must sell at least 70% of the merchandise they have already bought before they can order new merchandise.

    This sounds good because it implies that the best way to earn is to sell products rather than join people up as distributors. However, according to industry watchers it appeared that in many cases distributors merely sell on excess products to their downlines.
    http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-9th-circuit/1139924.html

    Regardless of the court ruling, many people believe that Omnitrition, like many other MLMs out there, is a very close to being a pyramid scam.

    See our short video on MLM to find out more: https://www.dietpillswatchdog.com/mlm-and-pyramid-schemes-video/

    Omni Drops

    Omni Drops are Omnitrition’s flagship product. The idea is that you take this supplement in combination with a very low calorie diet of 500 calories per day. It comes with instructions and recipes so the idea is that if you just do it, you will lose weight.

    According to the product information, the drops contain a blend of vitamins as well as something called hCG (human chorionic gonadotrphin). If you haven’t heard of hCG, it is a hormone found in the urine of pregnant women – and is actually the hormone that causes the pregnancy tests to show up positive or negative. It is also supposed to help you lose weight. We found the idea of ingesting human urine pretty yucky.

    Diet Drops and hCG

    Diet drops and this whole idea of hCG are nothing new. The idea dates back to the 1950s and a questionable scientist called Dr Albert T. W. Simeons who came up with the idea that following a very low calorie diet while taking drops composed of hCG would help you lose weight.

    Simeons came up with his theories while he was in India studying pregnant women and obesity in men.

    In 1954, Simeons published a book called Pounds and Inches and although his work has been universally rubbished by the scientific community, the idea of diet drops, hCG has since been resurrected. Today there are dozens of diet drop products on the market. They all look similar and come with an associated diet plan called a Protocol.

    It requires that the user loads his or her system with fatty food for two days then moving onto a starvation diet for either 21 or 42 days, eating only 500 calories a day and supported by the diet drops. If that idea sounds insane it is probably because it is.

    Naturally you will lose weight if you starve yourself for any period of time and with the definition of starvation set at between 300 – 700 calories a day, make no mistake this is exactly what you will be doing. It can be extremely dangerous for long term health. Omni Drops are supposed to sustain you while you follow this punishing regime.

    So What It Is Contained In Omni Drops?

    Nothing. There are zero active ingredients in Omni Drops. The label shows that this supplement contains hCG as well as vitamin B12, Magnesium Phosphate and Natrum Phosphate, but the truthful answer is that it does not. The reason is that the drops are homeopathic – surely one of the biggest rip offs known to the supplements world.

    Homeopathy?

    It is easy to get homeopathy confused with herbalism but it is not the same thing. Although both are given the title alternative medicines – there is nothing medicinal about homeopathy.

    According to the Federal Trade Commission, “Homeopathy, which dates back to the late-eighteenth century, is based on the view that disease symptoms can be treated by minute doses of substances that produce similar symptoms when provided in larger doses to healthy people.”

    When it comes to supplements, the figures are mind boggling. Here is what is actually contained in the diet drops.

    • hCG 3x 6x 12x 30x 60x
    • Vitamin B 12 3x 6x 12x 30x 60x
    • Mag Phos 3x 6x 12x 30x 60x
    • Nat Phos 3x 6x 12x 30x 60x

    These numbers – 3x 6x, 12x, 30x, 60x – refer to the amount of times that the original ingredient has been diluted. So, a 6x dilution means a million-fold dilution. 12x means a trillion-fold dilution. 30x or 60x dilutions are, respectively, dilutions of 1/1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (30 zeroes) and 1+60 zeroes).

    According to the FTC,

    Many homeopathic products are diluted to such an extent that they no longer contain detectable levels of the initial substance.

    The Federal Trade Commission is now requiring that producers of homeopathic remedies mark on the labels that there is “no scientific evidence that the product works”.

    The good news is that at least Omni Drops do not contain an ingredient extracted from the urine of pregnant women.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/homeopathy-treatments-must-be-labelled-to-say-they-do-not-work-us-government-orders-a7429776.html

    Are hCG diet drops like Omni Drops even legal?

    According to the FDA, hCG diet drop products are illegal; so this means that Omni Drops are technically illegal too.

    However with so many hCG drops on the market, this ruling is obviously hard to enforce. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is simply advising consumers to steer clear of these “homeopathic” human chorionic gonadotrphin (HCG) weight-loss products.

    FDA and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have issued seven letters to companies warning them that they are selling illegal homeopathic HCG weight-loss drugs that have not been approved by FDA, and that make unsupported claims.
    It is probably just a matter of time before they catch up with Omnitrition.
    http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm281333.htm

    Feedback

    Many people have discussed the Omni Drops on the Watchdog site and there is an interesting range of opinion so thanks to all the contributors for sharing their experiences.

    Donna felt that the diet was working,

    I’m on day 29 and I’ve lost 5 inches from my waist. I’ve tried all those other diets but no success. I’ve bought the 260 package with all supplements and I still have no energy. I have no motivation at all. When you restrict yourself from carbs your body will go in ketosis which burns your unwanted fat cells. I’m not sure why I’m losing the weight except that I’m only eating 500 calories. All the other diets that didn’t work didn’t make me feel like crap.

    We feel that Donna is experiencing side effects and losing weight because the weight loss diet of only 500 calories a day is so extreme.

    Stephanie reported similar,

    I am currently on my second round of the Omnitrition plan and it works wonders. Yes you follow a 500 calorie per day diet and no that’s not a lot at all. However, you have so much support and an infinite amount of recipes that you don’t feel you are starving. Not even close. In the first 21 day round I lost 26lbs. I’ve also maintained the loss

    Many Omnitrition distributors have joined in the discussion. A lady called Kim reported,

    Omnitrition is a wonderful company. If you were to go on a 500 calorie diet without the drops it would not be healthy. The drops release a large amount of abnormal fat from your cells. So with that and a clean eating plan you shed weight fat fast and not muscle. The business plan can be profitable, but this isn’t a pyramid scheme. It’s a group of people getting healthy and helping others do the same. Omnitrition Changes Lives!

    Jessica reported,

    I am an Omnidrops user and distributor. There is no scam behind the product. I lost 37.2 lbs in 35 dropping days my first round. I am currently on day 17 of my second round with a 24.4 lb loss. The product is very real and life changing. The ingredients consist of hCG and a cocktail of B vitamins. It works….

    It is undeniable that many people have lost weight using Omni Drops, but this is solely down to the 500 calories a day diet. Many people also enjoy the challenge of participating in an MLM business and making some extra cash in this way. This still does not make it right for everyone.

    The Future

    Omnitrition is still popular, but in our opinion the whole Omnitrition website and business model is looking dated. Even the official Facebook page has not seen a new post written by the company since 2013. The website does not appear to have been updated in the last 20 years and there are far better looking glossier MLM companies out there. In addition, we would have liked to have seen a price list without having to go through a distributor.

    We are never keen on MLMs because in the opinion of many business experts most MLMs do tread a fine line between a legal business and a pyramid scam, and Omnitrition is no exception.
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/100366687

    When it comes to Omni Drops, if the FDA has their way, it might be a matter of time before this homeopathic remedy is taken off the market. It is not good for health. Taking a very low calorie diet like this does come with some serious risks, and although this program undeniably helps people lose weight, at the end of the day the supplement is simply there to mask the fact that people are starving themselves thin.

    In our opinion you should certainly avoid it.

    Disclaimer: Our reviews and investigations are based on extensive research from the information publicly available to us and consumers at the time of first publishing the post. Information is based on our personal opinion and whilst we endeavour to ensure information is up-to-date, manufacturers do from time to time change their products and future research may disagree with our findings. If you feel any of the information is inaccurate, please contact us and we will review the information provided.



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