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XLS-Medical In The Line Of Fire

Recently there has been uproar all over social media regarding a certain advert about a slimming product, and this time it’s not Protein World in the spotlight. Instead it is XLS-Medical in the line of fire after they released a TV advert that featured two very slim women wanting to lose weight for a holiday.

xls-medical-max-strength

In this post we’ll investigate deeper into the product in question and what the public opinion has been like.

A bit of background on XLS-Medical:

The advertising for XLS-Medical claims it is the “No.1 weight loss brand in Europe and has helped thousands of dieters achieve their weight loss goals.” On the surface it seems that this company is genuine and has a strong following, being sold on the high street through shops such as Boots, ASDA, Superdrug and Holland & Barrett, not to mention that they currently have 17,981 people using the product according to their site.

Among their ambassadors is actress Denise Van Outen as she supports the XLS-Medical weight loss journey, which sees her interviewing people on their journey whilst using the products.

XLS-Medical Max Strength:

XLS-Medical Max Strength is their most effective product yet and is gaining a lot of ground in the industry and even more attention since the release of the advert promoting the product. However, the attention isn’t always good. It has been branded as being “irresponsible” and “shameful” due to the fact that it could influence younger people into taking diet pills when they don’t need to.

On the official website, XLS-Medical say this about the product:

XLS-Medical Max Strength is suitable for any adult who is overweight no matter their diet.

Yet they choose to feature two models in the advert who would be classed as a healthy weight? We can automatically see why people would disagree. Not only that but people are saying they seem too young to be featured in an advert for a product that is aimed at people over the age of 18.

The main ingredient in the Max Strength product is Clavitanol, which is, according to the website:

a patented organic plant based complex which reduces the break down and absorption of dietary carbohydrates, sugar and fat.

The product itself has been reviewed on our site where you can find more information in detail.

The advert:

The advert itself is very easy to find now that it is up on YouTube and being shown on TV channels such as ITV. It features the two women texting each other about a holiday they will be going on and how they will fit into their clothes. Once seeing how much weight her friend has lost she looks at herself dressed in baggy clothes with sadness.

The friend that lost weight suggests that the other use XLS-Medical to lose weight. The end of the ad shows them having fun in the sun wearing dresses.

What are people saying?

We definitely know that people aren’t happy as the Advertising Standards Authority has received nearly 200 complaints about the advert, which has led them to begin an investigation. Not only this, but people want others to boycott Boots for selling the product!

We took to twitter to see what they were saying. Take a look at the comments below.

XLS Medical #Boots advert is a disgrace, using 2 skinny girls to advertise a weight loss product is a disgrace! #BoycottBoots

-@jasemouse

Hate the XLS Medical ad. A slim woman frowning in the mirror because her clothes don’t fit. Outdated and irresponsible.

-@lovelylisaj

Disappointed with #XLS medical TV ad. Shocking portrayal of a thin woman complaining about not losing enough weight. Regressive advertising.

-@clinicaldarren

Just seen #XLSMedical advert promoted by BootsUK #Shameful this is aimed at young, healthy looking girls who do not need to lose weight!

-@BethBn37

I find that XLS Medical advert offensive. The girls in it look like teenagers. Diet pills for teenagers? No wonder they’re so body conscious.

-@KatieDailyEcho

I think it’s very irresponsible to use two slim girls to advertise #XLSMedical #weightloss tablets, what kind of message is that sending out.

-@WalkerDom

It seems that everyone is agreeing on the effect this advert will have on the public, especially young teenagers when the product is only for those over 18.

The Defence:

XLS-Medical have already been quick to address the claims regarding their advert and product by saying:

XLS-Medical is a responsible, clinically proven weight loss aid and we’re committed to providing consumers with clear and transparent information on our products. This includes working closely with an independent weight management consultant, to ensure that our advertising is aligned with Clearcast’s advertising guidelines, including making sure that the women featured in our ads are always age appropriate (in this case, the actresses were aged 24 and 29).

Source: Daily Mail

The Advertising Standards Agency spokeswoman said:

The complaints challenge the advert for being irresponsible because it promotes an unhealthy body image, particularly among young girls. Our investigation will also address whether it’s likely to appeal to girls under the age of 18. The investigation is well underway and we will publish our findings in due course.

So we can expect to hear more about this in the future.

Disclaimer: Our reviews and investigations are based on extensive research from the information publicly available to us and consumers at the time of first publishing the post. Information is based on our personal opinion and whilst we endeavour to ensure information is up-to-date, manufacturers do from time to time change their products and future research may disagree with our findings. If you feel any of the information is inaccurate, please contact us and we will review the information provided.



1 comment on “XLS-Medical In The Line Of Fire”

  1. sarah says:

    if people need to take diet pills so be it. I don’t hear many people complaining about fast food ads.if people made as big a deal about junk ads there would be no overweight people and there would be no need for diet pills.

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